Bridge: A MindSport for All has a range of resources that are free to download.

Son inspires mother to learn bridge

Henry Rose learnt bridge at school and inspired his mum, Helen, to take up the game. She says: ‘I learnt bridge and never looked back.’

More videos
Ida Gronkvist bridge Player

Bridge: A MindSport for All (BAMSA) has a range of resources including academic articles and summaries, conference papers, workshop presentations, videos and other visuals. More resources are being generated and, over time, the resources will become toolkits for two different but potentially overlapping audiences:

  • Practitioners: bridge organisations, players, teachers, local organisers
  • Public: schools, teachers, parents, young people, universities, employers, policymakers

With the exception of the videos and photographs, the following resources originate from the BAMSA research projects. All BAMSA resources are free to download. Stakeholder presentations are listed on the Network page. If you share the resources please credit BAMSA and email [email protected] to let the researchers know how you have used the resources (or plan to use them).

Audiovisual Resources
Stakeholder Presentations

Academic Resources

Book

Bridging Minds

Punch, S. (2021) Bridge at the Top: Behind the Screens, Toronto: Master Point Press

Journal Articles

Bridging Minds

Punch, S. and Russell, Z. (2022) ‘Playing with Emotions: Emotional Complexity in the Social World of Elite Tournament Bridge’, Emotions and Society. (https://doi.org/10.1332/263169021X16420048324097)

Russell, Z., Punch, S. and McIntosh, I. (2021) ‘Blurring the Boundaries Between Leisure and Work: Professionals as Devotees in the Mind-Sport Bridge,International Journal of the Sociology of Leisure. (https://doi.org/10.1007/s41978-021-00099-y)

Punch, S., Russell, Z. and Graham, E. (2021) ‘Serious Leisure Experience in a Dyadic Pursuit: Elite Player Motivations and Participation in Tournament Bridge,’ Leisure Studies (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02614367.2021.1942524)

Punch, S., Russell, Z. and Cairns, B. (2020) ‘(Per)forming Identity in the Mindsport Bridge: Self, Partnership and Community’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 56(6): 804-822 (doi/10.1177/1012690220959648)

Punch, S. and Snellgrove, M.L. (2020) ‘Playing your Life: Developing Strategies and Managing Impressions in the Game of Bridge’, Sociological Research Online (doi/10.1177/1360780420973043)

Punch, S. and Snellgrove, M.L. (under review) ‘Bridging Time: Intimate Couple Relationships and Playing Bridge’

Bridging Gender

Journal Articles

Rogers, A., Snellgrove, M.L. and Punch, S. (2022) ‘Between Equality and Discrimination: The Paradox of the Women’s Game in the Mind-sport Bridge,’ World Leisure Journal. (DOI: 10.1080/16078055.2022.2051068)

Punch, S. and Rogers, A. (2021) ‘Building, not Burning Bridges in Research: Insider/Outsider Dilemmas and Engaging with the Bridge Community’, Journal of Leisure Research, 53(2): 272-289, (https://doi.org/10.1080/00222216.2021.1887782)

Journal Articles

Bridging the Gap

Judge, K. and Punch, S. (2019) ‘Lessons Learned from Bridge: A Sociological Exploration of the New University of Stirling Bridge Club’, Stirling International Journal of Postgraduate Research SPARK, Issue 5

Journal Articles

Bridging Sociology

Snellgrove, M.L. and Punch, S. (under review) ‘Between Seeing and Unseeing: Managing Familiarity and Strangeness in Research Contexts’

Book Chapters

Bridging Minds

Punch, S. (2021) ‘Interview with Heather Dhondy’, Bridge at the Top: Behind the Screens, Toronto: Master Point Press

Online Papers

Bridging Wellbeing

Galbraith, C., Punch, S. and Small, C. (2018) ‘Competition and Mental Exercise in a Mind Sport: Building Bridges of Fun and Friendship’, Aylesbury: English Bridge Education & Development (EBED)

McDonnell, D., Punch, S. and Small, C. (2017) ‘Individual Wellbeing and Bridge: An Empirical Analysis’, Aylesbury: English Bridge Education & Development (EBED)

Ashworth, R., Punch, S. and Small, C. (2016) ‘A Review of Possible Interventions into Healthy Ageing and Cognitive Stimulation: Exploring the Links between Bridge and Dementia’, Aylesbury: English Bridge Education & Development (EBED)

BAMSA Reports

Bridging Gender
Rogers, A., Snellgrove, M.L. & Punch, S. (2021) Bridging Sexism: Gender Inequality at and away from the Bridge Table, BAMSA Working Paper 2, Stirling: University of Stirling.

BAMSA Reports

Bridging Covid

Snellgrove, M.L. and Punch, S. (2020) ‘Bridge in the Time of Covid-19: Emerging Findings’, BAMSA Report, Stirling: University of Stirling

Snellgrove, M., Punch, S and Rees, T. (2021) Using Digital Leisure to Tackle Social Isolation, Policy Briefing for the Scottish Government.

Available: https://www.stir.ac.uk/research/public-policy-hub/policy-briefings/

BAMSA Reports

Bridging Organisations

Snellgrove, M. L. & Punch, S. (2020) Challenges, Issues and Solutions facing National Bridge Organisations in Europe, BAMSA Report for the European Bridge League, Stirling: University of Stirling

Summary of the full report

Barnet, C. and Punch, S. (2021) Bridge Data Sources, BAMSA Working Paper, March 2021

Academic Blogs

Bridging Sociology

Snellgrove, M.L. (2019) ‘Taking Bridge Seriously’, Discover Society

Punch, S. (2020) ‘Bridge: A MindSport for All’, Leisure Studies Association

Conference Papers

Bridging Minds

Snellgrove, M.L., Graham, E. and Punch, S. (2019) ‘Playing your Life: Impression Management and Strategic Interaction in the Game of Bridge’, Leisure Studies Annual Conference, Abertay, 9-11 July 2019

Russell, Z. and Punch, S. (2019) ‘Temperament is Everything: Bridge Partnerships and Emotions’, Leisure Studies Annual Conference, Abertay, 9-11 July 2019

Punch, S. and Graham, E. (2018) ‘Elite Bridge Players’ Motivations to Participate in the Mindsport of Bridge’, 2nd academic conference on Recreational Activity and Bridge, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland, 5 December 2018

Conference Papers

Bridging Gender

Punch, S., Snellgrove, M.L., Graham, E. and McPherson, C. (2021) ‘Bridging Brains: Exploring Gendered Attitudes and Inequalities in a Mindsport’, The Academy of Leisure Sciences Virtual Conference, 8-19 February 2021

Video presentation

Graham, E. and Punch, S. (2016) ‘Why are Men More Successful at Bridge than Women?Centre for Research on Families and Relationships Conference, University of Edinburgh, 13 June

Graham, E. and Punch, S. (2016)Intellectual Contests, Gender and Bridge’, Royal Geographical Society Geographers’ Annual Conference, London, 28-30 August 2016.

Conference Papers

Bridging Wellbeing

Punch, S. and Graham, E. (2019) ‘Enhanced Wellbeing, Healthy Ageing and Social Connection: Motivations for Playing Bridge in the Community’, Leisure Studies Annual Conference, Abertay, 9-11 July 2019

Punch, S., Small, C. and McDonnell, D. (2017)Well-being, Social Participation and Bridge’, First academic bridge conference, Recreational Activity and Bridge in Older People’s Lives, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland, 20-21 April 2017

Conference Papers

Bridging Covid

Snellgrove, M.L. and Punch, S. (2021) ‘Digital Bridge during the Coronavirus Pandemic’, The Academy of Leisure Sciences Virtual Conference, 8-19 February 2021

Video presentation

Conference Papers

Bridging the Gap

Punch, S. and Judge, K. (2019) ‘Bridging the Gap: An Exploration of Transitions in Play through the Lifecourse’, EBED Teacher’s Conference, Milton Keynes, England, 15 June 2019

Judge, K. and Punch, S. (2019) ‘Lessons Learned from Bridge Lessons: A Sociological Exploration of the New University of Stirling Bridge Club, Scotland’, Leisure Studies Association Conference, Abertay University, Dundee, Scotland, 9– 11 July 2019

Punch, S. and Judge, K. (2018) ‘Bridging the Gap: An Exploration of Transitions in Play Through the Lifecourse’, International Scientific Conference: Play and Lifelong Learning, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, Torun, Poland, 5 December 2018

Conference Papers

Bridging Sociology

Punch, S. and Snellgrove, M.L. (2019) ‘Keep Bridge Alive: Challenges and Opportunities’, Brain and Mind: Promoting Individual and Community Wellbeing International Conference, Catholic University of Croatia, Zagreb, 12 December 2019

General Articles

Bridging Minds

Punch, S. (January 2019) ‘Interview with Roy Welland’, One of a Series of Bridge Encounters, ClaireBridge

Podcasts

Bridging Sociology

The Setting Trick, Interview with Samantha Punch by John McAllister, Episode 7, 19 November 2018

Resources

Bridging Wellbeing

Word Clouds from the wellbeing survey data (created by Antoni Sieminski)

Resources

Bridging Sociology

Lecture Materials

Punch, S. (2019) Mindsports and Leisure Communities: The Case Study of Bridge, Undergraduate Module on Place, Belonging and Identity, University of Stirling: Stirling, 5 February 2019

Word Clouds

Based on Bridge Winners post asking players to describe bridge in three words

Data

Bridging Minds

A selection of the edited interview transcripts has been published by Master Point Press in the book Bridge at the Top: Behind the Screens (2021)

Data

Bridging Wellbeing

The survey data is public and available via the University of Stirling’s data repository

Additional Information

Bridging Covid

Call for participants:

BAMSA Recruitment Letter & Prompts.pdf

BAMSA Participant Information Sheet.pdf

Or email views on bridge and Covid-19 to [email protected]

Additional Information

Bridging Sociology

Sociology of Mindsport as an Academic Field

The sociology of mindsport is a new and innovative area of research and teaching. While there is considerable research on chess and some on poker, there has been very little written across the social sciences on bridge. There is currently no university module that examines sociological concepts, theories and themes that facilitate an understanding of the complexities of mindsports, including their social roots and societal importance.

Given that mindsports are cultural and social practices that cannot be separated from social concerns in contemporary society, it is timely to introduce such a module to university teaching. It is important for students to investigate the meanings and motivations of participation in mindsports in relation to social and global divisions. By exploring the complexity of the social and cultural contexts of mindsport in relation to work, family and everyday life in contemporary society, the development of the sociology of mindsport will bring to light some of the major controversies and issues that confront leisure and sport studies today.

Sociology of bridge

The sociology of bridge is about understanding how the bridge world works: what motivates players, opportunities for skill development and the dynamics of the game. BAMSA projects are researching interactions and relationships within the mindsport, wellbeing, transferable life skills, health and social benefits, intergenerationality, youth participation, digital approaches and the growth and sustainability of the global bridge community. By carrying out research that highlights the benefits and skills that playing bridge provides, we can develop an evidence base from which to persuade governments, communities and schools to consider investing in introducing more bridge into primary and secondary schools, universities, workplaces and community centres.

In order to achieve this evidence base, the BAMSA research team is undertaking a sociological exploration of bridge including the social and non-technical aspects of the mindsport. The card game of bridge involves overlapping boundaries between work, leisure, gender studies, gerontology and mindsport. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws on literature from a variety of academic areas.

Each of the BAMSA studies will be supervised or led by Professor Punch, who has more than 20 years’ experience of undertaking research with families, children and young people, and who is an international bridge player in her own right. The global BAMSA network ensures the research is directly linked to the work of the European Bridge League (EBL), the American Contract Bridge League (ACBL), the South Pacific Bridge Federation and the World Bridge Federation (WBF).

Sociology of mindsport

The academic study of the sociology of mindsport explores sociological theories, debates and controversies regarding the social, cultural, economic and political aspects of leisure and sports studies. It enables a critical understanding of the connections between leisure, mindsport and sport which are considered alongside their relationship to work and family life.

Mindsports, such as chess and bridge, focus on cognitive aspects of play and competition, structured by rules and goals. An academic understanding of mindsport considers both professional and recreational levels undertaken during ‘free time’ or work time; chosen for pleasure, relaxation, employment or other emotional satisfaction. The growth of mindsports can bring families, local, national and international communities together via shared goals, with positive implications for healthy ageing and intergenerational socialisation.

Reflections

Mindsports involve intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, while also reflecting power and status. They are socially constructed, relative to the social, political and economic conditions that exist in any given society at any given time.

As sociologists, BAMSA researchers explore the potential of mindsports to contribute positively to mental and physical health, wellbeing and social connection, and investigate their contribution to the formation of self and identity. They examine the barriers and opportunities regarding mindsport participation and the role of mindsport in relation to nationalism, the economy, health policy, globalisation, digitalisation, commodification and inequalities. They consider the place of mindsports within contemporary, globalised societies and analyse the extent to which they reflect social divisions in wider society.

The best game ever invented

TV newsreader, James Mates, talks about how bridge keeps our minds active and alive. He emphasises the importance of partnership and communication in a game of incomplete information. He compares a good bridge partner with a good life partner.

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